All Hail The Power Of Jesus' Name Lyrics

Getty Music hymns

Chorus:
All hail the pow'r of Jesus' Name
Let angels pros'trate fall
Bring forth the roayl diadem
And crown Him Lord of all
Bring forth the royal diadem
And crown Him Lord of all

All Hail The Power Of Jesus' Name Video

All Hail The Power Of Jesus' Name Lyrics

Verse 1
All hail the pow'r of Jesus' Name
Let angels pros'trate fall
Bring forth the royal diadem
And crown Him Lord of all
Bring forth the royal diadem
And crown Him Lord of all
 
Verse 2
Ye chosen seed of Israel's race
Ye ransomed from the fall
Hail Him who saved You by His grace
And crown Him Lord of all
Hail Him who saved You by His grace
And crown Him Lord of all
 
Verse 3
Let ev'ry kindred ev'ry tribe
On this terrestrial ball
To Him all majesty ascribe
And crown Him Lord of all
To Him all majesty ascribe
And crown Him Lord of all
 
Verse 4
Oh that with yonder sacred throng
We at His feet may fall
We'll join the everlasting song
And crown Him Lord of all
We'll join the everlasting song
And crown Him Lord of all

HYMN STORY
It is interesting that those who express the most eloquent praise are often the people we would deem the least likely to have the ability. Yet David, the adulterating, murdering, lying king of Israel wrote a good deal of the Psalms, which we still use today as our guide for worship. In the same way, all accounts show Rev. Edward Perronet (1721-1792) to be a sharp-tongued, difficult personality, who would rather pick a fight over theology than display brotherly love.
Though Perronet was a minister of the established Church of England, his evangelical, or "dissenting" roots grew deep. His father had been associated with Whitefield and the Wesleys, and Perronet himself worked with the Wesleys until they split over the question of administering the Sacraments. Perronet then found work as a chaplain for the famous patroness of the evangelical movement, Countess of Huntingdon, but was soon removed from his post due to his violent attacks on the established church. (Acidic remarks like, "I was born and I am like to die in the tottering communion of the Church of England; but I despise her nonsense." are the kind that force even the hardiest dissenter to keep their distance!)
The text first appeared anonymously in 1780 in Gospel Magazine with the title "On the Resurrection." Many argue that the hymn has experienced continued popularity due to the hymntune MILES LANE which appeared with it in Gospel Magazine and the tunes CORONATION and DIADEM which have accompanied the text since that time. The poem was edited and added to by Rev. John Rippon for his book A Selection of Hymns, from the Best Authors intended to be an Appendix to Dr. Watts's Psalms and Hymns (1787), and his edition is the one commonly used in hymn books today. --Greg Scheer, 1997